Double Weekly Feed

The Appalachian Anti-Twilight: Wild Girls, penned by The Art of the Rural contributor/advisor Mary Stewart Atwell, was published this week by Scribner. Our congratulations to our colleague for her fantastic work! Watch the trailer, by Charlie Cline, below, for more information: http://vimeo.com/50507091

Check out this great write-up on our friend Brian Frink and Rural America Contemporary Art in The Free Press of Mankato, Minnesota. http://mankatofreepress.com/features/x688442713/Local-artist-Frink-creates-website-magazine-to-showcase-cutting-edge-rural-art

Located in Madison County, Iowa, “The Westbrook Artists’ Site is a project for exploration of the post-industrial rural condition.” Much more, including a mission statement, below: The Westbrook Artists’ Site (WAS) explores the continuity between rural and urban contexts. If the rural is typically viewed as what was left behind in the process of urbanization, WAS insists, to the contrary, that rural life and landscape need to be seen as vital parts of a system that is urban and rural. WAS cultivates art and design as purposeful interventions within such an interconnected system. The WAS project mission challenges participants to find and explore the connective tissue binding rural and urban worlds and to create modes of address that speak from a rural landscape to both rural and urban audiences. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Westbrook-Artists-Site/446809552028025

“Big Tex – his mouth moved as he uttered ‘Howdy, folks!’ – was celebrating its, or his, 60th birthday. But on Friday, Big Tex caught fire and was all but destroyed in the flames and thick smoke. His fiberglass head, hat and boots were consumed, as were most of his fabric clothes, leaving only his outstretched arms, belt buckle and metal skeleton intact.” Read the New York Times story here. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/20/us/fire-destroys-big-tex-icon-of-texas-state-fair.html?hp&_r=1&gwh=F37C27DBA15C3C18DD2F040427A30A51&

The rural-urban phenomenon of 1990’s alt-country needs to be explored further, warts and all. One of the more contentious members of the movement, Whiskeytown (Ryan Adams), is the subject of this new book. Browsing the page samples illustrates his conscious mirroring of the musical model of Uncle Tupelo and Jay Farrar: http://www.amazon.com/dp/0292725841

Appalshop filmmaker Mimi Pickering joins biographer Catherine Fosl to discuss Anne Braden: Southern Patriot on Kentucky Educational Television. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KW92GK1hvk&list=PLF4FA4A4D5AD0EACC