Jan
23

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Listening: “Call the Days,” Nadia Reid

“I was happy on my own / I would call the days as they were known”

Nadia Reid’s debut full-length album Listen To Formation, Look For The Signs is the culmination of ten years’ writing.

The seeds of Reid’s song writing were sewn while she was growing up in Port Chalmers. Bob Scott, from The Bats, was her guitar teacher for a while but the pivotal moment came a little later.

Reid and Hannah Harding, who plays under the name Aldous Harding, started to sing and write music together. One summer they lived together. That led to performing together, and Nadia’s course was set.

Listen to Formation, Look for the Signs is out soon in the US via Scissor Tail records. More information here.

Jan
22

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Reading/Looking: “Down at the Sweetheart Rink” and the Photography of Bill Yates

“I had just purchased a medium-format, twin-lens camera, and, as usual, I was out riding around looking for something to shoot,” [Bill Yates] says. Sweetheart Roller Skating caught his eye. The Sweetheart was in a distinctly rural area of Hillsborough County called Six Mile Creek, beyond the Palm River east of downtown Tampa. Old Florida was still Old Florida then. Disney World had opened only a year earlier and had barely begun its transformation of Central Florida.

“The owner was just driving up,” he recalls. “‘Mind if I shoot some pics?’ I asked. He said, ‘Sure, but if you want some good ones, come back tonight — this place will be jumpin’.’” He took his Mamiya C330, a Honeywell Strobonar flash, and eight rolls of Tri-X 220 black-and-white film. He shot every roll.”

Chuck Reece writing in the bitter southerner on the upcoming Bill Yates exhibition at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art.

Jan
18

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Reading: “On reality TV in Tanzania women win fame, fortune – and farm tools”

“Oxfam’s ultimate goal is to promote new agricultural practices and give greater voice to Tanzania’s women farmers.

Women make up 75 percent of Tanzania’s farmers but they often live in poverty and their contribution is rarely valued, the charity says.

The World Bank estimates that giving women farmers around the world equal access to resources, such as fertilizer and land, could increase farm yields by up to 30 percent. This would mean up to 150 million fewer people going to bed hungry every day.”

“On reality TV in Tanzania women win fame, fortune – and farm tools,” by Katy Migiro of the Christian Science Monitor.